Pacific Island Ecosystems at Risk (PIER)

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Wisteria sinensis
(Sims) DC., Fabaceae
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Present on Pacific Islands?  yes

Primarily a threat at high elevations?  yes

Common name(s): [more details]

English: Chinese glycine, Chinese wisteria

Habit:  vine

Description:  "Lianas, to 25 m. Stems twined leftward, white villous when young, soon glabrescent. Leaves 7-13-foliolate; rachis 15-25 cm, including petiole 3-5 cm; leaflet blades elliptic-ovate to lanceolate-ovate, 5-8 x 2-4 cm with basal pair smallest and becoming larger apically, both surfaces appressed pubescent when young but glabrescent, base rounded to cuneate and somewhat asymmetric, apex attenuate to caudate. Racemes terminal or axillary from branchlets of previous year, 15-30 x 8-10 cm, white villous. Pedicel 2-3 cm, slender. Flowers 2-2.5 cm, fragrant. Calyx with adaxial tooth longer than others. Corolla purple or occasionally white; standard orbicular, sometimes retuse, glabrous, apex truncate. Ovary tomentose, with 6-8 ovules. Legume oblanceolate, 10-15 x 1.5-2 cm, tomentose, hanging on branches persistently. Seeds 1-3 per legume, brown, thickly lenticular, ca. 1.5 cm in diameter, shiny"  (Flora of China online).

Habitat/ecology:  Probably only a threat in the Pacific at upper elevations.

Propagation:  Seed

Native range:  China (GRIN).

Presence:

Pacific
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian Islands
Kaua‘i Island   Starr, Forest/Starr, Kim (year unknown)
Pacific Rim
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
China
China
China (People's Republic of) native
Zhengyi, Wu/Raven, Peter H./Deyuan, Hong (2013)
"Mountain forests; 500-1800 m".
China
China
Hong Kong introduced
cultivated
Wu, Te-lin (2001) (p. 156)
Ornamental.
New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand (country) introduced
invasive
cultivated
Webb, C. J./Sykes, W. R./Garnock-Jones, P. J. (1988) (p. 701)
"Waste places, scrubland".
Persisting from cultivation and vegetative spread.
Also reported from
Country/Terr./St. &
Island group
Location Cited status &
Cited as invasive &
Cited as cultivated &
Cited as aboriginal introduction?
Reference &
Comments
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
United States (other states) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)
United States (continental except west coast)
United States (other states)
USA (Florida) introduced
U.S. Dept. Agr., Nat. Res. Cons. Serv. (2013)

Control:  Additional control information from the Bugwood Wiki.

Physical: "Cut climbing or trailing vines as close to the root collar as possible. This technique, while labor intensive, is feasible for small populations, as a pretreatment for large impenetrable infestations, or for areas where herbicide use is not desirable. Wisteria will continue to resprout after cutting until its root stores are exhausted. For this reason, cutting should begin early in the growing season and, if possible, sprouts cut every few weeks until autumn. Cutting will stop the growth of existing vines and and prevent seed production. However, cut vines left coiled around trunks may eventually girdle trees and shrubs as they continue to grow and increase in girth. For this reason, the vines should be removed entirely or at least cut periodically along their length.

Grubbing, removal of entire plants from the roots up, is appropriate for small initial populations or environmentally sensitive areas where herbicides cannot be used. Using a pulaski, weed wrench or similar digging tool, remove the entire plant, including all roots and runners. Juvenile plants can be hand pulled depending on soil conditions and root development. Any portions of the root system not removed may resprout. All plant parts (including mature fruit) should be bagged and disposed of in a trash dumpster to prevent reestablishment" (Weeds gone wild).

Chemical: "Cut stump treatment, using a systemic herbicide, is effective in areas where vines are established within or around desirable native plants or where they have grown into the canopy. This treatment is effective as long as the ground is not frozen. Cut the stem as close to ground level as possible. Immediately apply a 25% solution of glyphosate (e.g., Roundup) or triclopyr (e.g., Garlon) and water to the cross section of the stem. Retreatment with a foliar application of glyphosate may be necessary for any sprouts.

Use foliar spray herbicide treatments to control large infestations of exotic wisterias. It may be necessary to precede foliar applications with stump treatments to reduce the risk of damaging non-target species. Apply a 2% concentration of glyphosate (e.g. Round Up) or triclopyr (e.g. Garlon) and water, plus a 0.5% non-ionic surfactant to thoroughly wet all foliage. Chlorpyralid (e.g. Transline) is effective at a concentration of 0.5% and is selective to plants in the aster, buckwheat, and pea families. Caution should be taken with chlorpyralid as groundwater pollution through leaching can be a problem with certain soil types. Do not apply spray so heavily that herbicide drips off the leaves. Glyphosate is a non-selective systemic herbicide that may kill non-target plants that are only partially contacted by spray. Triclopyr is selective to broadleaved species and is a better choice if native grasses are present. Ambient air temperature should be above 65F for all foliar treatments" (Weeds gone wild).


Need more info? Have questions? Comments? Information to contribute? Contact PIER! (pier@hear.org)

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This page was created on 18 JAN 2004 and was last updated on 14 DEC 2010.