Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR)

Euglandina rosea
(a type of snail)

cannibal snail, rosy wolf snail

image of Euglandina rosea image of Euglandina rosea image of Euglandina rosea
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Euglandina rosea is one of the demonstrated predators on extant populations of Hawaiian tree snails. By 1958, Euglandina was found in Makaki Heights [Oahu] with dead Achatinella (Kondo, field notes [Appendix II, RPFTOTSOTGA 1993]), Since its introduction, Euglandina rosea has spread to low and high elevations throughout the Koolau and Waianae Ranges [Oahu] and has been the cuase of the local extinction of many populations of Achatinella (field notes of Hadfield, Kondo, Christensen, and Chung [Appendix II, RPFTOTSOTGA 1993].  Euglandina rosea was introduced to Hawaii between 1955 and 1956 by the Hawaii State Department of Agriculture in an effort to control the African snail (Achatina fulica). Euglandina rosea is a voracious predator on other terrestrial and arboreal snails and is responsible for the extinction of all eight species of the tree snail genus Partulaet al., 1988). Euglandina rosea follows mucous trails of other gastropods (Cook, 1985) and will climb trees and bushes to capture its prey.   Euglandina rosea is native to the southeastern USA. 


Species description or overview

Information about Euglandina rosea from IUCN's ISSG/GISD
ISSG

Euglandina rosea: information from ISSG/GISD
Information on the "rosy wolf snail" (aka "cannibal snail") (Euglandina rosea)--including details about its ecology, distribution, management, and impacts--is available from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) created by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).

Euglandina rosea description and ecology from GISD (ISSG)
A species description and information about the ecology of Euglandina rosea as an invasive species is provided from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). GISD was created and is maintained by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).


Taxonomy & nomenclature

Euglandina rosea information from ITIS
The Integrated Taxonomic Information System ITIS provides authoritative taxonomic information on Euglandina rosea, as well as other plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.


Impacts

Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy (2000) View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format
The status of invasive plants, vertebrates, arthropods, molluscs, and crustaceans, and options for a regional invasive species strategy for the South Pacific are presented in this series of articles from the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme, 2000.

Euglandina rosea impacts
General and location specific impacts of Euglandina rosea are reviewed in this Global Invasive Species Database article.

Euglandina rosea impact information from GISD (ISSG)
Impact information regarding Euglandina rosea as an invasive species is provided from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). GISD was created and is maintained by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).


Control methods

Euglandina rosea management
Euglandina rosea management information and links to resources are provided by the Global Invasive Species Database.

Euglandina rosea management information from GISD (ISSG)
Management information for Euglandina rosea as an invasive species is provided from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). GISD was created and is maintained by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).


Images

Euglandina rosea images by PT
Euglandina rosea images are presented online by Maui photographer Philip Thomas and are freely available for noncommercial use.

Euglandina rosea images from HEAR
High-quality images of Euglandina rosea are provided by the Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR).


Distribution

Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy (2000) View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format
The status of invasive plants, vertebrates, arthropods, molluscs, and crustaceans, and options for a regional invasive species strategy for the South Pacific are presented in this series of articles from the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme, 2000.

Euglandina rosea: distribution information from ISSG/GISD
Distributiopn information about the "rosy wolf snail" (aka "cannibal snail") (Euglandina rosea) is available from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) created by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).

Euglandina rosea worldwide distribution from GISD (ISSG)
Worldwide distribution information about Euglandina rosea is provided from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). GISD was created and is maintained by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).


Case studies

Rosy wolfsnail, Euglandina rosea, exterminates endemic island snails
Predator snail Euglandina rosea introduced as a biocontrol agent to Hawaii has devastated endemic species of Achatinella.


In the news

Protection for gorgeous Hawaii tree snails
The habitat of the last population of the Big Island tree snail Partulina physa will be protected by a conservation agreement between the land owner and the Nature Conservancy (Raising Islands blog, Jan TenBruggencate, 1/14/2009).


Full-text articles

The decimation of endemic Hawaiian tree snails by alien predators (abstract)
The alien predatory snail, Euglandina rosea eats all sizes of native Hawaiian snail Achatinella mustelina and can rapidly drive populations to extinction (American Zoologist, 1993).

Evolution and extinction of Partulidae, endemic Pacific island land snails (abstract)
Introduced plants and animals have played a role in the extinction of endemic land snails on Moorea (Philosophical Transactions: Biological Sciences,1992).

Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy
South Pacific Regional Environmental Programme (SPREP). Sherley, Greg (ed.) . 2000. Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy. Apia, Samoa: South Pacific Regional Environment Programme. ISBN: 982-04-0214-X.

Slime-trail tracking in the predatory snail, Euglandina rosea (abstract).
Slime-trail tracking in Euglandina is a robust, easily measured and manipulated behavior that is a good model system for studying sensory processing and learning (Behavioral Neuroscience, 2003).


Experts

Euglandina rosea (mollusc) experts
Information and advice on Euglandina rosea are available from contacts on this list.

Euglandina rosea contacts from GISD (ISSG)
Contact information for experts on Euglandina rosea as an invasive species is provided from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). GISD was created and is maintained by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).


Other resources

Three Mountain Alliance Management Plan, December 31, 2007 View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format
The Three Mountain Alliance provides watershed protection and management to over one million acres across Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Hualalai on Hawaii Island. This plan identifies management goals (pdf).

Euglandina rosea references
References and links for Euglandina rosea are provided by the Global Invasive Species Database.

Euglandina rosea references from GISD (ISSG)
References regarding Euglandina rosea as an invasive species is provided from the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). GISD was created and is maintained by IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG).


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The Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk (HEAR) project was historically funded by the Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) through PIERC (USGS) with support from HCSU (UH Hilo). More details are available online. Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII)

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